User Research

Case studies are becoming more and more prevelent with designers to show case their work outside the final deliverables. So much of design work is not explicit in the finished product and the magic really happens way before you put the finishing pixels on a mockup.

Development team was based out of San Francisco, but our product wasn’t available in California. In as such, some of these tools became a lot harder and expensive to carry out. It also ruled out certain design tools such as card sorting or other things that you carry out earlier in the process. As I didn’t carry out those practices at the company, I didn’t profile them here. And that’s my warning to you all: although I profiled multiple tools here, this list isn’t exhaustive. 

The traditional design process consists of these five steps, in this order: Research, Hypothesis, Prototype, Evaluate, and Build. 

The single best analogy that I can think of to describe the design process is an endless game of chute.

Process is a practice of pragmatism

Throughout my career, I’ve encounter multiple occasions where there is a divide between understanding of the toolkit a designer has and the knowledge of these design tools stakeholders, engineers, or even who you report to have. 

In part to communicate to some stakeholders at my old company ChooseEnergy, I’ve documented these tools as a means of reference for them. ChooseEnergy had a burning desire to “do design right” but there was a gap of knowledge and the design team often ran into this wall multiple times as we tried to build support for tools and practices.

ChooseEnergy was in an interesting predicament when it came to user-centered design.

Throughout my career, I’ve encounter multiple occasions where there is a divide between understanding of the toolkit a designer has and the knowledge of these design tools stakeholders, engineers, or even who you report to have. 

In part to communicate to some stakeholders at my old company ChooseEnergy, I’ve documented these tools as a means of reference for them. ChooseEnergy had a burning desire to “do design right” but there was a gap of knowledge and the design team often ran into this wall multiple times as we tried to build support for tools and practices.
ChooseEnergy was in an interesting predicament when it came to user-centered design.